2018 Clean Cargo Emissions Factors Report Published

Annually, Clean Cargo discloses trade lane carbon dioxide emissions factors for ocean container transport, this year collected from 22 ocean container carriers on more than 3,200 ships that collectively represent approximately 85 percent of ocean container capacity worldwide. Our annual reporting indicates that average CO2 emissions per container per kilometer for global ocean transportation routes fell 1 percent from 2016 to 2017.  Since Clean Cargo began publicly reporting data from the industry in 2009, emissions per container per kilometer have dropped 37.1 percent on average.

Several years ago, Clean Cargo published its peer-reviewed, standardized methodology and reporting system that has been adopted globally by the industry, with carriers submitting operational data from the entire fleet to BSR on an annual basis. The results produce environmental performance scorecards for each carrier, which are used to meet corporate supply chain sustainability goals by 95 percent of shipping customers who participate in the group.

Today, Clean Cargo tools represent the industry standard for measuring and reporting ocean carriers’ environmental performance globally. Clean Cargo’s 50 members benefit from these tools while sharing knowledge and best practices for cutting emissions, and they publicly demonstrate their commitment to global efforts to reduce emissions.

2017 Clean Cargo Trade Lane Emissions Factors Report

Annually, BSR’s Clean Cargo discloses trade lane carbon-dioxide-emissions factors for ocean container transport, this year collected from more than 3,200 ships for 22 ocean container carriers that collectively represent 87 percent of ocean container capacity worldwide. Our annual reporting indicates that average carbon dioxide emissions per container per kilometer for global ocean transportation routes were reduced by 2.4 percent from 2015 to 2016. This was also the first year that 100 percent of carriers included in the emissions factors were verified using the Clean Cargo protocol.

Today, Clean Cargo tools represent the industry standard for measuring and reporting ocean carriers’ environmental performance globally. Clean Cargo 50 members—including 30 global brands and freight forwarders—benefit from these tools while sharing knowledge and best practices for cutting emissions, and they publicly demonstrate their commitment to global efforts to reduce emissions.

Three Reasons Why Collaboration Is Key to Green Freight

Three Reasons Why Collaboration Is Key to Green Freight

Freight movement is the lifeblood of global supply chains and economic development in many regions. It is also at the heart of many 21st-century challenges to global business: Markets want shipping to be faster, more flexible, and more sustainable. Yet freight is a distributed, global system, in which no single entity controls central decision-making—and, likewise, green freight efforts are dispersed and interconnected in unexpected ways.

Collaborative Progress: Clean Cargo 2016 Progress Report

The Paris Agreement has increased environmental performance expectations from customers, regulators, and consumers. However, standardized data and forums that can help companies remain ahead of trends and regulation are few and far between. This report provides an update on the progress of Clean Cargo, now in its 13th year, and the annual disclosure of carbon-dioxide-emissions factors for ocean container transport collected from over 3,300 vessels.

Clean Cargo includes 45 members representing 85 percent of ocean container cargo carriers and many customers. In 2016, Clean Cargo Members have developed and adopted a Climate and Call to Action Statement, committing to improving the performance of ocean shipping and calling for increased ambition, collaboration, and action from all stakeholders for low-carbon logistics.

Clean Cargo also continues to provide standardized methodologies to measure key environmental performance indicators and easy-to-use tools to reduce environmental impacts. The 2016 data collection shows an 8 percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions per twenty-foot equivalent (TEU) per kilometer from the previous year.

The Supply Chain Leadership Ladder

For many years, companies across all industries have had sustainable supply chain programs focused on managing sustainability risks and opportunities among their global supplier networks. Leading companies recognize that these supply chain sustainability programs create value, and we have seen a positive trend toward more impact-focused programs among these leaders.

This working paper introduces the Supply Chain Leadership Ladder, a maturity model for supply chain sustainability programs, which companies can use to identify their level of maturity and impact and develop their program toward deeper impact in accordance with their level of ambition.

Clean Cargo Carbon Emissions Accounting Methodology

This report provides a detailed description of Clean Cargo's accounting methodology for carbon dioxide emissions. This industry-standard methodology is used by container carrier operators worldwide, representing more than 80 percent of global container cargo carried. Following the guidance in this report ensures its applicability and proper use for performing emissions calculations, bench-marking, and evaluation of performance.

Clean Cargo will continue to engage with policymakers and other global initiatives to ensure this methodology remains in leading practice among global industry carbon-emissions-accounting methodologies.

Business Action for Climate-Resilient Supply Chains

Global supply chains are among the most critical levers for companies to take action on climate changeand to gain business benefits from building resilience. However, supply chains are complex, diverse, and exposed to multiple, intersecting climate risks. Knowing where to start and how to take action is a challenge.

Through an action framework, resources for practitioners, and examples from BSR member companies, this report outlines how business can act on climate change by building resilience in the supply chain.

How BSR’s Clean Cargo Helps Shippers Improve Environmental Performance

Globally, transporting goods by ocean accounts for about 3 percent of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions associated with climate change—more than the CO2 emissions from all the energy it takes to run the internet. As companies assess their exposure to climate risks and drive down emissions in their supply chain, they face two dilemmas: how to both measure and improve environmental performance in their logistics supply chains.

For 12 years, BSR's Clean Cargo has developed tools and methodologies that help shippers and their carrier suppliers understand and manage CO2 emissions from ocean transport. One of our priorities is to make the decision-making process simpler for shippers, which is the purpose of a short guide that we are launching today.

Clean Cargo's “How to Calculate and Manage CO2 Emissions from Ocean Transport” was produced with lessons from global brands (“shippers”) that are members of Clean Cargo. It describes how transportation procurement managers use Clean Cargo data and tools to:

  • Calculate a CO2 footprint

  • Assess supplier environmental performance

  • Select suppliers using sustainability criteria

For example, Clean Cargo member Marks & Spencer uses the data and tools to measure, evaluate, and report the CO2 impact of its global goods transportation. This allows the company to establish a baseline from which to measure improvements over time from approved CO2-saving initiatives. “By being a member of Clean Cargo, we can review and compare ocean carriers (our suppliers) on their sustainability practices and set expectations with transport providers for continuous improvement,” says Barry Wallace, logistics manager at Marks & Spencer, and member of the Clean Cargo Steering Committee.

The guide explains how to perform such comparisons by using illustrative trade routes. For example, three carriers provide the same service from Asia to North America’s East Coast, Asia to northern Europe, and Europe to Latin America. Using Clean Cargo emissions factors for each of these carriers, which is a measure of environmental performance, a shipper can compare its suppliers. In the example from the report, there is a difference in environmental performance of more than 50 percent across these three suppliers.

The Clean Cargo network also helps shippers engage with like-minded organizations. Clean Cargo provides a unique platform for peer companies to share best practices, and for brands to embed the latest developments across the transport supply chain into procurement. In 2015, Clean Cargo member-only webinars, facilitated by BSR, will ensure shippers stay on top of how peers are assessing their business partners to make their ocean supply chains more carbon efficient.

Underpinning these results is the ease of use that comes with a standardized methodology. The Clean Cargo CO2 emissions calculation methodology was developed over several years with industry practitioners, specialists, and academic experts. Recognized as the industry standard, 85 percent of the ocean container shipping industry uses this tool today. We will be releasing a new report this spring that provides technical details to the use and application of the methodology.