Webinar: Navigating to Smart and Sustainable Logistics Procurement

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Are you a logistics professional looking for guidance on how organizations, big or small, can leverage their freight transport and logistics procurement demands to make a positive impact on the reduction of GHG emissions and air pollutants across the supply chain?

If so - this is the webinar for you!

Join BSR, the Smart Freight Centre, and WBCSD as they share action-driven approaches to delivering on sustainable procurement and providing organizations with a pathway towards a brighter, cleaner, and better way of doing business together.

The webinar will cover:

  • Freight and logistics emissions: how multinationals hold the key to change

  • How companies can report, reduce and collaborate, becoming more efficient, saving costs and minimizing emissions

  • Expert insights and an introduction to a practical toolbox of actions: implementing the Smart Freight Procurement guidelines and the GLEC Framework

  • Collaborative next steps - and more!

Clean Cargo and APL Host Fall Member Meeting

Clean Cargo was delighted to host its Fall 2018 Members Meeting at the APL Singapore office from 13 to 15 November 2018.

Gathering like-minded shippers, carriers, and freight forwarders working for clean oceans and global climate goals, the event saw stakeholders deep-diving into methodologies to:

  • influence carbon emission reduction;

  • support improvement in Environmental, Social and Governance of the industry; and

  • advance the scale of the Clean Cargo to have more stakeholders aboard.

At the meeting, APL was elected to serve on the Clean Cargo Steering Committee from 2019.

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Closing the meeting, Nicolas Sartini, APL CEO, said:

“The shipping industry has advanced well with strategies to meet the Global Sulphur Cap 2020. Stakeholder collaboration and the search for solutions remain crucial in reducing carbon emissions by at least half by 2050. Committed to responsible and sustainable cargo transportation, our group will continue to address carbon emissions as a priority.”

Frank Clary, CSR Director of Agility and Clean Cargo Steering Committee Member, said:

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“It has been good progress. We have a new strategy and we are engaging a lot of people in the growing community. We adopted a three-year work plan during this meeting with two different groups of members working on these issues. We have some defined outcomes and a timeline we want to achieve, and we have allocated people who have volunteered to do the actual work. So we are expecting good progress in terms of measuring, reporting, and managing sustainability in the supply chain and procurement. And underneath all, the ambition of the group aligns with the global ambition of keeping temperature increases below two degrees. The work we are doing supports IMO requirements, objectives, and aspirations, and it will improve how the carriers are going to operate. It is going to be an expansion and improvement and in my opinion.”

Tomas Dahlman, Director Energy of Electrolux, Clean Cargo Steering Committee Member, commented:

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“The most important thing is the three-year workplan, with a focus on innovation, procurement methodology, and revising and updating the carrier ratings by expanding the scope to include forwarders. We have made good progress, starting on the innovation workstream. We have focused on decarbonisation and have included a new segment - Roll on, Roll off (RoRo) - in the group. The decision to move forward with the supplier sustainability index for the carriers and forwarders was also important. Shippers will have a revised assessment tool to rate carriers based on both qualitative and quantitative information. It will rate the suppliers based not only on their CO2 performance but also on their strategy, innovation, and goals.”

Nate Springer, Acting Director of Clean Cargo, concluded:

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“This meeting has been all about people getting things done and members have rolled up their sleeves to work towards that. Shippers are very excited to drive forward their work with the Forwarders and Carriers, and this is what is needed to execute on what has become a much more ambitious workplan and strategy than what we adopted at the last June meeting. I am incredibly happy that we might just make progress on all these fronts. We are in a good position to continue driving forward and making progress on emissions reductions, improvement on ethics and governance issues, and playing an important and critical role in coordinating and bringing together different stakeholders that are essential to making that progress.”

(All photos courtesy of APL.)

Clean Cargo Member Maersk Sets Ambitious Goal of Zero Carbon Emissions by 2050

With the aim of accelerating the transition to carbon-neutral shipping, Maersk recently announced its goal to reach carbon neutrality by 2050. To achieve this goal, carbon-neutral vessels must be commercially viable by 2030, and an acceleration in innovation and adoption of new technology is required.

To date, Maersk has reduced its relative CO2 emissions by 46% (baseline 2007), around 9% above the industry average.

“The only possible way to achieve the so-much-needed decarbonisation in our industry is by fully transforming to new carbon neutral fuels and supply chains,” says Søren Toft, Chief Operating Officer at A.P. Moller - Maersk.

“We applaud Maersk’s new goal that aligns with Clean Cargo’s new strategy,” says Nate Springer, Acting Director of Clean Cargo. “Clean Cargo will do everything it can to support Maersk, and any shipping company, that sets bold climate goals. We also believe that Maersk’s goal highlights the need innovation, investment, and scale of cleantech in shipping.”

Read more here.

2018 Clean Cargo Emissions Factors Report Published

Annually, Clean Cargo discloses trade lane carbon dioxide emissions factors for ocean container transport, this year collected from 22 ocean container carriers on more than 3,200 ships that collectively represent approximately 85 percent of ocean container capacity worldwide. Our annual reporting indicates that average CO2 emissions per container per kilometer for global ocean transportation routes fell 1 percent from 2016 to 2017.  Since Clean Cargo began publicly reporting data from the industry in 2009, emissions per container per kilometer have dropped 37.1 percent on average.

Several years ago, Clean Cargo published its peer-reviewed, standardized methodology and reporting system that has been adopted globally by the industry, with carriers submitting operational data from the entire fleet to BSR on an annual basis. The results produce environmental performance scorecards for each carrier, which are used to meet corporate supply chain sustainability goals by 95 percent of shipping customers who participate in the group.

Today, Clean Cargo tools represent the industry standard for measuring and reporting ocean carriers’ environmental performance globally. Clean Cargo’s 50 members benefit from these tools while sharing knowledge and best practices for cutting emissions, and they publicly demonstrate their commitment to global efforts to reduce emissions.

2017 Clean Cargo Trade Lane Emissions Factors Report

Annually, BSR’s Clean Cargo discloses trade lane carbon-dioxide-emissions factors for ocean container transport, this year collected from more than 3,200 ships for 22 ocean container carriers that collectively represent 87 percent of ocean container capacity worldwide. Our annual reporting indicates that average carbon dioxide emissions per container per kilometer for global ocean transportation routes were reduced by 2.4 percent from 2015 to 2016. This was also the first year that 100 percent of carriers included in the emissions factors were verified using the Clean Cargo protocol.

Today, Clean Cargo tools represent the industry standard for measuring and reporting ocean carriers’ environmental performance globally. Clean Cargo 50 members—including 30 global brands and freight forwarders—benefit from these tools while sharing knowledge and best practices for cutting emissions, and they publicly demonstrate their commitment to global efforts to reduce emissions.

Three Reasons Why Collaboration Is Key to Green Freight

Three Reasons Why Collaboration Is Key to Green Freight

Freight movement is the lifeblood of global supply chains and economic development in many regions. It is also at the heart of many 21st-century challenges to global business: Markets want shipping to be faster, more flexible, and more sustainable. Yet freight is a distributed, global system, in which no single entity controls central decision-making—and, likewise, green freight efforts are dispersed and interconnected in unexpected ways.

Collaborative Progress: Clean Cargo 2016 Progress Report

The Paris Agreement has increased environmental performance expectations from customers, regulators, and consumers. However, standardized data and forums that can help companies remain ahead of trends and regulation are few and far between. This report provides an update on the progress of Clean Cargo, now in its 13th year, and the annual disclosure of carbon-dioxide-emissions factors for ocean container transport collected from over 3,300 vessels.

Clean Cargo includes 45 members representing 85 percent of ocean container cargo carriers and many customers. In 2016, Clean Cargo Members have developed and adopted a Climate and Call to Action Statement, committing to improving the performance of ocean shipping and calling for increased ambition, collaboration, and action from all stakeholders for low-carbon logistics.

Clean Cargo also continues to provide standardized methodologies to measure key environmental performance indicators and easy-to-use tools to reduce environmental impacts. The 2016 data collection shows an 8 percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions per twenty-foot equivalent (TEU) per kilometer from the previous year.

The Supply Chain Leadership Ladder

For many years, companies across all industries have had sustainable supply chain programs focused on managing sustainability risks and opportunities among their global supplier networks. Leading companies recognize that these supply chain sustainability programs create value, and we have seen a positive trend toward more impact-focused programs among these leaders.

This working paper introduces the Supply Chain Leadership Ladder, a maturity model for supply chain sustainability programs, which companies can use to identify their level of maturity and impact and develop their program toward deeper impact in accordance with their level of ambition.